Wired & Wireless Microphone Master Class at Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas

DPA Microphones and Lectrosonics to Present Wired & Wireless Microphone Master Class at Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas

DPA and Lectrosonics Info Comm 2018v3 Color

Master Class to be Held the Day Before InfoComm 2018

LAS VEGAS, May 15, 2018 – On Tuesday June 5, 2018 at Club Vinyl at The Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas, DPA Microphones and Lectrosonics will co-host a day of Wired and Wireless Microphone Master Classes. The Master Class is free to audio professionals for the benefit of learning and networking with their peers.

These two manufacturers specialize in providing high-quality solutions for professional sound engineers to help them achieve the best results possible for a variety of applications including live sound, film, broadcast and theater.

Hosted by Eric Stahlhammer of DPA Microphones and Kelly Fair of Lectrosonics, the Master Class on Wired and Wireless Microphones will be held from 9:30AM to 4:30PM PST, with presentations from each of these manufacturers. From 9:45AM to 12PM, Kelly Fair from Lectrosonics will present his Master class on FCC Re-Pack, Frequency Coordination, Antenna systems & Antenna Usage & a brief Product Overview. Then, lunch will be provided. From 1:00PM to 4:00PM, Eric Stahlhammer from DPA will present a Master Class on Microphone Technology for High Performance Venues.

“We are looking forward to taking a deep dive into how a great microphone can help change the game in performance venues,” says Eric Stahlhammer, regional sales manager at DPA Microphones. “We often forget to consider that the conversion of acoustic to electrical energy is the most critical part of the sound chain. We can only manipulate what we have captured. Starting with great technique and the best microphone for the job is something we are excited to demonstrate and discuss in Las Vegas.”

“We all know how challenging the RF environment has become for wireless mics and in ear monitoring systems," says Kelly Fair, Western regional sales manager and “One of the Fanatics” at Lectrosonics. “That’s why it’s important for us to discuss the application of sound fundamentals of RF management and antenna, and RF distribution techniques. We are especially excited to do this in a master class setting in Las Vegas - one of the most difficult RF environments I have come across.”

Club Vinyl is located inside The Hard Rock Hotel at 4455 Paradise Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89169. To sign up for this free event, please register at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/dpa-microphones-and-lectrosonics-to-present-wired-wireless-microphone-master-class-at-hard-rock-tickets-46084315428.

ABOUT DPA MICROPHONES

DPA Microphones is the leading Danish Professional Audio manufacturer of high-quality condenser microphone solutions for professional applications. DPA’s ultimate goal is to always provide its customers with the absolute finest possible microphone solutions for all its markets, which include live sound, installation, recording, theatre and broadcast. When it comes to the design process, DPA takes no shortcuts. Nor does the company compromise on its manufacturing process, which is done at the DPA factory in Denmark. As a result, DPA’s products are globally praised for their exceptional clarity and transparency, unparalleled specifications, supreme reliability and, above all, pure, uncolored and undistorted sound. For more information, visit www.dpamicrophones.com.

ABOUT LECTROSONICS

Well respected within the film, broadcast, and theatre technical communities since 1971, Lectrosonics wireless microphone systems and audio processing products are used daily in mission-critical applications by audio engineers familiar with the company's dedication to quality, customer service, and innovation. Lectrosonics is a US manufacturer based in Rio Rancho, New Mexico. 

* This text and image content is for Editorial Use Only and may not be used in any kind of commercial or promotional material or advertising without written permission.


Feature Films Lean on Production Sound Mixer Colin Nicolson & Lectrosonics

Production Sound Mixer Colin Nicolson and His Latest Lectrosonics Kit

“My Lectrosonics equipment has travelled well and always been reliable. Having the ability to increase the output of the transmitters has helped on several occasions.”

Worcester, UK (May 8, 2018) — UK-based Colin Nicolson has worked as a production sound mixer and recordist since the eighties, first in television and documentaries then increasingly in motion pictures, over recent years racking up credits including Murder on the Orient Express, T2 Trainspotting and The Theory of Everything. In 2013 he began to invest in Lectrosonics Digital Hybrid Wireless® equipment, initially for Edgar Wright’s The World’s End including HM plug-on and SMV belt pack transmitters and SR dual channel and Venue receivers. And he has been steadily expanding his Lectro inventory ever since, most recently adding SSM micro belt pack transmitters.

Nicolson purchased a pair of SSM micro belt pack transmitters for his current production, Walt Disney Pictures’ Artemis Fowl, which started principal photography in March and is scheduled to shoot in England, Northern Ireland and Ho Chi Minh City. The film, directed by Kenneth Branagh, stars Judi Dench, Josh Gad and a newcomer, Ferdia Shaw, in the lead role. It is based on the young adult fantasy novel by Irish author Eoin Colfer, featuring the battles of 12-year-old genius Artemis Fowl II against a powerful, hidden race of fairies who may be behind his father’s disappearance, is set for release in August 2019.

According to Nicolson, his initial two SSM transmitters had proved very useful when used with some of the tightly tailored costumes that he encountered on recent productions. For example, he says, “The SSM transmitter was useful for hiding on Alicia Vikander when I mixed the UK part of Tomb Raider. So much so that I bought another two for my current production, Artemis Fowl.”

Nicolson made his first major investment in Lectrosonics equipment for The World’s End, starring Simon Pegg, Nick Frost and Martin Freeman and directed by Edgar Wright. “Because The World’s End was fast, comedic dialogue with at least five principals, the on-set sound had to be the 'final' recording, as Edgar didn’t want to have to use ADR for such fine-tuned performances,” he explains. “I decided to upgrade my wireless and Lectrosonics was the obvious choice because of their great reputation in the industry.”

For that initial Lectrosonics purchase, he says, “I chose the Venue receiver, two SR Series receivers and eight SMV transmitters: Venue because its 19-inch rack mounting fit comfortably on my cart and the SMVs because of their size. The SR Series receivers could be used with my Sound Devices 633 when we had to go 'portable,' but could also be used as extra channels on my cart,” he says.

Nicolson soon had several opportunities to test the reliability of Lectrosonics under adverse conditions. “The next major feature I used Lectrosonics transmitters and receivers on was Victor Frankenstein, where their reliability on a very wet set for the castle scenes at the end was seriously tested—and well passed. A great demonstration, if one was needed, of the build quality,” he says.

“The same was true when I mixed on Sacha Baron Cohen’s The Brothers Grimsby. The transmitters were submerged in a sinking car and subjected to elephant 'nastiness' in the womb!” he says.

Having already added two HM transmitters for use on booms and placement mics, Nicolson continues, his next production sound project, Murder on the Orient Express, featured a very large cast—including Kenneth Branagh, Tom Bateman, Penélope Cruz, Willem Dafoe, Judi Dench, Johnny Depp, Josh Gad, Derek Jacobi and numerous others—that placed even greater demands on his location sound kit. “I had to increase my channel count. I invested in a Venue 2 receiver and more SMB transmitters, another HMa and two SSMs.”

Typically, he adds, “I mix with a Professional Sound Corp. Solice audio mixer and record on a Sound Devices 970, but for this production I invested in a Yamaha QL1 mixer. I took advantage of the higher track count of the 970 using the Dante digital audio protocol.”

Before Nicolson reunited with Branagh for the current Artemis Fowl production, he acquired a third SR Series dual-channel receiver, which also came in handy on his most recent shoot. “A third SR allows six channels in portable mode, which came in very useful on The Kid Who Would Be King, which is being released the beginning of 2019, when we filmed at several locations with very difficult access,” he says.

Nicolson has filmed in countries in Europe and the Far East, including in some difficult locations, but the Lectrosonics gear has always been up to the task, he reports. “My Lectrosonics equipment has travelled well and always been reliable. So far, apart from Rome, which has an infamous RF problem, I’ve not had any RF issues. But having the ability to increase the output of the transmitters has helped on several occasions.”

About Lectrosonics

Well respected within the film, broadcast, and theatre technical communities since 1971, Lectrosonics wireless microphone systems and audio processing products are used daily in mission-critical applications by audio engineers familiar with the company's dedication to quality, customer service, and innovation. Lectrosonics is a US manufacturer based in Rio Rancho, New Mexico. 

* This text and image content is for Editorial Use Only and may not be used in any kind of commercial or promotional material or advertising without written permission.

New Firmware Update for the Acclaimed PDR Portable Digital Recorder

Lectrosonics PDR Firmware Update

Update Offers New Features and Enhanced Functionality for the Micro Recorder

Rio Rancho, NM (April 24, 2018) -- Lectrosonics is pleased to announce a new Firmware update, V2.0, for their acclaimed professional micro digital recorder, the PDR (Portable Digital Recorder). Since its introduction a little over a year ago, the PDR’s highly compact size and professional quality sound has made it an ideal choice for a wide range of productions, from feature films to extreme sports and professional videography. The unit’s tiny size and rounded shape make it unobtrusive and simple to place in garments and costumes, and easy to conceal when used as a “plant” microphone to capture environmental or location sound. The new Version 2.0 Firmware Update incorporates a number of user suggestions, including the addition of iXML file header support, Filesystem protection, and an improved menu structure.

The new Update offers iXML Header Support, which allows for recordings to contain industry-standard iXML data in the file headers, enabling easy handling in typical editing software. And Filesystem Protection adds provisions to protect recorded data on the Micro SD card when users mount the card onto a computer. The menu structure has also been updated with some items moved to submenus, including “Timecode…”, “SD Card…” and “Settings…”, which is designed to allow for quicker and easier navigation for users.

Additional functional enhancements provided by the Firmware Update include:
Timecode can now be copied from the internal real time clock. Scene and take numbers can now be manually entered, and are embedded in the filenames and iXML headers of recordings. Take number automatically increments each time the record button is pressed.

File browsing and playback can now be organized by file or by scene and take. And the PDR now understands recordings made in SMWB Series transmitter/recorders and can list their format, length, timestamp information, etc. (Note that the PDR cannot play SMWB recordings because of the sample rate mismatch.) For greater convenience, recording segment size has been increased from approx. 200 MB to 4 GB. On the largest SD card size supported (32 GB), the maximum number of segments a single recording can have is 8. And finally, the two original file naming templates ("Clock Time" and "Sequence") have been enhanced.

“Lectrosonics has been very proud to offer the PDR, which gives professionals a highly compact, professional grade sound recorder at a very attractive price point. In a little over a year since its introduction, we’ve been amazed by the variety of uses that our customers have found for it,” says Karl Winkler, VP of sales for Lectrosonics. “And users have given us valuable feedback, so we are pleased to incorporate some of their suggestions in the new Version 2.0 Firmware Update for the PDR. We’re always grateful for input which helps improve our products!”

The new PDR v.2.0 Update is downloadable free from the PDR – Firmware page: https://www.lectrosonics.com/Support/category/93-firmware.html

Users should follow the instructions in the PDR user manual for updating firmware in the unit: https://www.lectrosonics.com/US/PDR/product.html

About Lectrosonics

Well respected within the film, broadcast, and theatre technical communities since 1971, Lectrosonics wireless microphone systems and audio processing products are used daily in mission-critical applications by audio engineers familiar with the company's dedication to quality, customer service, and innovation. Lectrosonics is a US manufacturer based in Rio Rancho, New Mexico. 

* This text and image content is for Editorial Use Only and may not be used in any kind of commercial or promotional material or advertising without written permission.

Lectrosonics Introduces Cloaking Mode for SSM Micro Transmitters

Lectrosonics Introduces Cloaking Mode

“For applications where even the SSM isn’t small enough”

Rio Rancho, NM (April 1, 2018) – Lectrosonics is pleased to introduce “Cloaking Mode,” a new feature for the SSM micro bodypack transmitter that renders the unit invisible. Firmware version 4.1.18 includes a mode where the DSP (Digital Signal Processor) cycles are cranked up so fast that the electrons traveling through the unit start to interact with the materials in the rest of the unit in a novel way only recently discovered by physicists.

“Normally, these kinds of interactions are something only seen by scientists working with large-scale particle accelerators,” stated Karl Winkler, VP of Sales & Service at Lectrosonics. “But, after reading one of those fascinating articles in Scientific American magazine, our engineers thought we should give it a try. I’m glad we did – the results are nothing short of spectacular!”

Since the attached electret lavaliere or head-worn microphones receive a bias voltage from the transmitter, the microphone is also rendered invisible when the cloaking feature is engaged. The only downside is that the battery life is drastically shortened, due to the extreme increase in current demand from the DSP running as such a fast rate. The SSM normally runs for 6+ hours on a freshly charged LB-50 lithium ion battery. But with the Invisibility Mode engaged, the battery life is shortened to 30 minutes. And, when the battery dies, the unit becomes visible again.

And since the SSM running in Cloaking Mode gets hot from the increased DSP cycles and resulting battery current drain, it may be possible to see the unit if viewing it with an infrared camera like those used for “night vision” and some security cameras.

The new firmware version 4.1.18 is free can be downloaded from the Lectrosonics web site. The cloaking feature is then engaged by using the popular Lectro RM app, available for smartphones from a 3rd party developer.

Watch this video for more on Cloaking Mode: https://youtu.be/Q2f0wPDjGzY.

About Lectrosonics

Well respected within the film, broadcast, and theatre technical communities since 1971, Lectrosonics wireless microphone systems and audio processing products are used daily in mission-critical applications by audio engineers familiar with the company's dedication to quality, customer service, and innovation. Lectrosonics is a US manufacturer based in Rio Rancho, New Mexico. 

* This text and image content is for Editorial Use Only and may not be used in any kind of commercial or promotional material or advertising without written permission.

KRGV Channel 5 News Launches New Spanish Language Newscast

KRGV Channel 5 News Launches New Spanish Language with Lectrosonics

“We like to give our workers the best tools to get the job done and we will continue to stick with something we know is going to work. That’s why we choose Lectrosonics.”

Weslaco, TX (March 27, 2018) – EMMY® award-winning KRGV Channel 5 News, the ABC Affiliate here owned by the Manship Family since 1964, recently launched their new Spanish-language news program on the Somos El Valle 5.2 channel in January 2018. For the new program, which was in development for more than a year, the station has added to their arsenal of Lectrosonics Digital Hybrid Wireless® equipment, which now includes the Duet Digital IEM Wireless Monitor System, LT belt pack, LMb belt pack, HM plug-on and IFBT4 frequency agile compact transmitters, LR compact and Venue receivers.

“Now that we’re doing more content, we’ve given the L-Series to our photographers with the smaller cameras,” says Israel Alfaro, Operations Manager and an award-winning photojournalist who has worked at KRGV for nearly 25 years. “The L-Series kit has three channel blocks you can switch from if you’re having any type of issue, which is pretty awesome. We also use the shoe adapter from the kit.”

The new Spanish language newscast, is currently being filmed in studio A at KRGV, uses the Lectrosonics IFB system with 6 receiver packs, and the lav mics are on 6 LMb transmitters with a Venue receiver system. “Our news cast has a lot of moving positions and we go live a lot in our studio, so we use Lectrosonics wireless belts to make things easier,” Alfaro says.

In Studio B, Alfaro is about to finish adding the Lectrosonics Duet IFB system to their existing collection of HM transmitters and Venue receivers. “The Duet is pretty cool because it transmits everything separately; each person can talk to each other separately within the studio instead of everyone speaking under one line.” As soon as the system is fully installed the Spanish newscast will make the transition to Studio B. All of the programs on KRGV use Lectrosonics equipment, according to Alfaro, some of which they have had for many years. With the FCC changes, he plans on continuing to replace his current Lectrosonics gear with Lectrosonics newer, smaller receivers. “KRGV has used Lectrosonics for a long time and we still have much of our original equipment because it’s so reliable and works amazingly well,” says Alfaro. “And we’ll be adding even newer Lectro gear.”

Before becoming Operations Manager of KRGV, Alfaro started his career as a cameraman working in production and commercials. He then moved onto photojournalism where he eventually became chief, and was first introduced to Lectrosonics equipment. Alfaro’s biggest challenge came at the beginning of his career with KRGV, which is located in Rio Grande Valley, Texas, where there was constant interference from nearby radio stations in Mexico. Once the station went with Lectrosonics, the issue was finally resolved.

“Lectrosonics gets great connection everywhere; I love my job, but I love it much more when I know that equipment is going to work,” Alfaro says. “It’s important to work smart, and we can’t have trouble during a live broadcast,” he says. In fact, Alfaro sent his staff out with Lectrosonics gear to Houston for the live broadcast from Hurricane Harvey. “We like to give our workers the best tools to get the job done and we will continue to stick with something we know is going to work. That’s why we choose Lectrosonics.”

About Lectrosonics

Well respected within the film, broadcast, and theatre technical communities since 1971, Lectrosonics wireless microphone systems and audio processing products are used daily in mission-critical applications by audio engineers familiar with the company's dedication to quality, customer service, and innovation. Lectrosonics is a US manufacturer based in Rio Rancho, New Mexico. 

* This text and image content is for Editorial Use Only and may not be used in any kind of commercial or promotional material or advertising without written permission.